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Estimation of Impervious Surface Distribution by Linear Spectral Mixture Analysis: A Case Study in Nantong, China

  • Ping Duan
  • Jia Li
  • Xiu Lu
  • Cheng Feng
Conference paper
Part of the EAI/Springer Innovations in Communication and Computing book series (EAISICC)

Abstract

In recent years, with rapid expansion of cities, natural ecological landscapes centering on green environments such as vegetation have been gradually replaced by impervious buildings. Consequently, a severe influence that cannot be ignored has been imposed on the whole ecological environment. In this paper, the main urban area of Nantong of China is used as a study area. Landsat 8 satellite remote-sensing images are used as a data source and linear spectral unmixing method is utilized to extract impervious surface information of the city and to study the distribution conditions of impervious surface percentage (ISP). The experimental analysis indicates the closer to the commercial area and highly intensive residential area, the bigger the ISP will become.

Keywords

Impervious surface Impervious surface percentage Linear spectral mixture analysis Nantong city 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ping Duan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jia Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Xiu Lu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Cheng Feng
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Tourism and Geographic SciencesYunnan Normal UniversityKunmingChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Remote Sensing for Universities in YunnanKunmingChina
  3. 3.Center for Geospatial Information Engineering and Technology of Yunnan ProvinceKunmingChina

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