Total Quality Management

  • Patria de Lancer JulnesEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-31816-5_1872-1
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Synonyms

Definition

TQM is an organization-wide, integrative effort to continuously improve the quality of an organization’s products or services and fully satisfy the needs and wants of their customers/clients.

Introduction

Total quality management (TQM) has a long but spotty history, filled with false starts and great achievements that can be traced back to the American factories of the early 1900s. The emergence of mass production and concomitant need for standardization and cutting waste drove factories to emulate laboratories testing the scientific approach to improve productivity and efficiency. This era saw the emergence of both Frederick Taylor’s brand of scientific management and quality control (QC), the forerunner of TQM. However, unlike scientific management, the QC approach concepts and techniques received only sporadic attention in the United States (USA). QC figured prominently in the USA at the height of military production...

Keywords

Total Quality Management Quality Movement Quality Circle Quality Control Chart Quality Control Department 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Penn State HarrisburgMiddletownUSA