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Recognition and Multiculturalism

  • Nicholas H. SmithEmail author
Living reference work entry
  • 159 Downloads
Part of the Springer Reference Geisteswissenschaften book series (SPREFGEIST)

Abstract

The article begins by noting some internal links between the concept of recognition and multiculturalism. It then looks at how the idea of multiculturalism features in three of the main contemporary theories of recognition, those proposed by Charles Taylor, Nancy Fraser and Axel Honneth. It identifies some common misinterpretations of these theories in relation to their claims about multiculturalism and it mentions some other ways in which theories of recognition are relevant to multiculturalism.

Keywords

Multiculturalism Recognition Taylor Fraser Honneth 

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Copyright information

© Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH, ein Teil von Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia

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