Encyclopedia of Teacher Education

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Care and Professional Identity

  • Daniel Leach-McGillEmail author
  • Kylie Smith
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-1179-6_380-1
  • 5 Downloads

Introduction

This entry will highlight teacher professional identity in the context of policy trends toward neoliberal forms of accountability and transparency presented as “professional” practice. It will explore some of the tensions present between these neoliberal techniques (such as quality standards and performance measurement) and [alternative] values on which teacher professional identities often rest. Specifically, the entry will explore concepts of care and relationality that are often entwined, yet overlooked, in teacher professional identity. This will foreground discussion of some ways that professional identity is both performed and measured differently depending on diverse sets of personal, practice, political, and policy values and consequences.

Many argue that the origins of the neoliberal policy framework are dated back to the 1980s UK government of Margaret Thatcher. Neoliberal economic, education, and political thinking privileges the private sector over the public...

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References

  1. Dahlberg, G., & Moss, P. (2005). Ethics and politics in early childhood education. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Lynch, K., Baker, J., & Lyons, M. (2009). Affective equality: Love, care and injustice. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lynch, K., Grummell, B., & Devine, D. (2012). New managerialism in education: Commercialization, carelessness and gender. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Smith, K., Tesar, M., & Myers, C. (2016). Edu-capitalism and the governing of early childhood education and care in Australia, New Zealand and the United States. Global Studies of Childhood, 6(1), 123–135.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Tronto, J. C. (2013). Caring democracy: Markets, equality and justice. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sonja Arndt
    • 1
  1. 1.Melbourne Graduate School of EducationUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia